Friday, August 8, 2014

Insider challenges Woodward's 'Deep Throat' claim



Insider challenges Woodward's 'Deep Throat' claim
Contends Post reporters forced to cover up illegal sources
Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman played Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein in the 1976 film “All the President’s Men”
By Jerome R. Corsi
NEW YORK – On the 40th anniversary of President Richard Nixon’s resignation, key facts about the Watergate scandal that brought him down remain in dispute, including the identity of Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward’sDeep Throat” source.

Roger Stone, a GOP insider who has worked in eight presidential campaigns, beginning with Nixon in 1968, has written a controversial new book, “Nixon’s Secrets: The Rise, Fall, and Untold Truth about the President, Watergate, and the Pardon,” that contends Deep Throat was not Mark Felt, as Woodward insists, but a composite figure.

“There’s not a chance Mark Felt was Deep Throat,” Stone told WND in an interview.

At 19 years old, Stone was the youngest member of Nixon’s Committee to Re-elect the President, commonly known at the time as CREEP.

“The heat was getting so much on Woodward and Bernstein at the Washington Post that there had to be a Deep Throat,” Stone said. “Otherwise, it would have been clear Woodward and Bernstein got much of their information questioning grand jury witnesses, a clear criminal violation.”

WND left a voice phone message for Woodward at the Washington Post asking for comment on this story but received no response.

Stone asserted “the trail was beginning to lead to Al Haig,” the White House chief-of-staff during Watergate.

In his book, Stone explained the tie to Haig:

Woodward did not want it known to the public that during his own military service in the Navy, while assigned to work for the National Security staff at the White House, Woodward often briefed General Alexander M. Haig, who later became a major source for Woodward. In fact Woodward told bold lies to conceal his background to anyone who looked into it. “I never met or talked to Haig until sometime in the spring of ’73,” Woodward said. “I defy you to produce somebody who says I did the briefing, it’s just – it’s just not true.”

Stone claims Woodward’s naming Mark Felt as Deep Throat was a convenient way to stop the extensive probing into the sources Woodward and Bernstein tapped for their series of articles at the Washington Post exposing Watergate.

“The heat was getting great about whether or not there was a Deep Throat, and along comes Mark Felt, who was flat broke and need the money,” Stone explained to WND.

“They help each other. Felt assumes the mantle of Deep Throat, and that solves a problem for Woodward,” he said.

“Now the lie about Felt being Deep Throat is that Woodward can’t stop telling the lie, no matter how much evidence accumulates to disprove the claim,” Stone claimed. “Woodward is trapped in the lie. The book he and Bernstein wrote, ‘All the President’s Men,’ and the movie with Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman established in the public’s mind that Deep Throat was a person who really existed.

“What I believe is that Deep Throat is a composite of several sources.”

‘Felt swore to me he was not Deep Throat’

Ralph de Toledano, the ghostwriter who claims to have completely rewritten the manuscript of what became Felt’s 1979 book, “The FBI Pyramid: From the Inside,” wrote an article, “Deep Throat’s Ghost,” published in the American Conservative July 4, 2005, in which he claimed, “Felt swore to me that he was not Deep Throat, that he never leaked information to the Woodward-Bernstein team or anyone else.”

Barry Sussman, one of Woodward’s and Bernstein’s editors at the Washington Post during Watergat, wrote in a June 17, 1997, article titled “Watergate 25 Years Later” that Deep Throat “barely figured in the Post’s Watergate coverage.”

Sussman claimed he and the Washington Post editors above him routinely knew the names of the Watergate sources, and Deep Throat was a relatively minor figure whose contributions were infrequent.

Deep Throat, Sussman repeatedly asserted remained anonymous only because he was unimportant.

David Obst, the former literary agent for Bernstein and Woodward, told the New York Times in 1998 that Deep Throat was a composite character, “a plot device to fit the narrative needs of the book and the film who was never mentioned in the original book proposal.

Jeff Himmelman, a Woodward protégé who began his career at the Washington Post, published a series of articles in New York magazine in 2012 that included portions of an interview Ben Bradlee, the Washington Post executive editor during Watergate, gave in 1990 to Barbara Feinman, who was helping Bradlee write his memoirs.

Here’s what Bradlee told Feinman, referring to scenes in the movie showing Woodward arranging secret meetings with Deep Throat:

    Did that potted [plant] incident ever happen? … And meeting in some garage? One meeting in the garage? Fifty meetings in the garage? I don’t know how many meetings in the garage. … There’s a residual fear in my soul that isn’t quite straight.

Himmelman realized almost immediately the comments by Bradlee threatened to undermine Woodward’s legacy and possibly even the legacy of the Washington Post reporting on Watergate.

In his recorded interviews with Feinman, Bradlee went so far as to disparage the importance of Watergate as a news event.

“I mean the crime itself was really not a big deal,” he said. “Had it not been for the Nixon resignation it would be really a blip in history. The Iran-Contra hearing was a much more significant violation of the democratic ethic than anything in Watergate.”

WND columnist Pat Buchanan, in a 2012 article titled “The Unraveling Myth of Watergate,” understood the importance of Himmelman’s revelations, repeated in Himmelman’s 2012 book “Yours in Truth: A Personal Portrait of Ben Bradlee.”

“Woodward tried to get Bradlee to retrack,” Buchanan wrote.

“He told Himmelman not to include the statements in his book. He pleaded. He threatened. He failed. That Woodward became so alarmed and agitated that Bradlee’s bullhockey detector had gone off over the dramatized version of ‘All the President’s Men’ suggests a fear in more than just one soul here.”

White House coup?
                                
What is most provocative in Stone’s effort to debunk the myth of Deep Throat is his suggestion that the Pentagon and the CIA had decided Nixon must go. The top brass opposed Nixon’s decisions to withdraw from Vietnam and pursue détente with both Russia and China, and Woodward, according to Stone, was determined to hide the extent to which Haig used and manipulated him to oust the president.

“Haig and his Pentagon patrons knew that it was only a matter of time before Nixon would be forced from office, and it was Haig who would walk Nixon inexorably toward the exit, while at the same time brokering control of Nixon’s papers and tapes, as well as the pardon of the thirty-seventh president,” Stone wrote.

“Haig’s leaks to Woodward would also explain some of the more bizarre stories regarding Nixon’s determination in “The Final Days,” where Woodward was clearly being briefed by one of the few men who still had access to Nixon. ‘The Final Days’ would recount Nixon’s growing isolation, his heavy drinking, and his conversations with portraits of dead presidents on his nocturnal wanderings through a darkened White House.”

Richard Nixon
Richard M. Nixon was the president of the Richard M. Nixon administration, the founder of the Center for the National Interest, an honorary member of the Bohemian Club, Alexander M. Haig Jr. was his chief of staff, and the Watergate scandal led to end of presidency.

Note: Wallace Gregson Jr. is the senior director, China & the Pacific for the Center for the National Interest, was the assistant secretary for Asian & Pacific security affairs at the U.S. Department of Defense for the Barack Obama administration.
Henry A. Kissinger is an honorary chairman for the Center for the National Interest, a member of the Bohemian Club, a director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), a member of the Bohemian Club, a director at the American Friends of Bilderberg (think tank), and a 2008 Bilderberg conference participant (think tank).
Dov S. Zakheim is the vice chairman for the Center for the National Interest, a director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), and was the under secretary for the U.S. Department of Defense.
Chuck Hagel is the secretary at the U.S. Department of Defense for the Barack Obama administration, and was the chairman for the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank).
William H. Webster is an honorary director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), and was a director at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).
W. Mark Felt was an associate director at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), a source known as "Deep Throat" in the Watergate scandal source, and Bob Woodward’s source in Watergate coverage.
Open Society Foundations was a funder for the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank).
George Soros is the founder & chairman for the Open Society Foundations.
Alexander M. Haig Jr. was an honorary director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), and Richard M. Nixon’s chief of staff.
Richard L. Armitage is a director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), and Bob Woodward’s source.
James L. Jones Jr. is a director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), a friend of Bob Woodward, and was the commander, U.S. European Command for the U.S. Department of Defense.
Bob Woodward’s source is Richard L. Armitage, a friend of James L. Jones Jr., wrote early stories about the Watergate scandal, and sent email warning Gene B. Sperling on sequestration coverage, 2013
G. Gordon Liddy was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping in connection with the Watergate scandal, a special agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Jimmy Carter commuted prison sentence.
Jimmy Carter commuted G. Gordon Liddy’s prison sentence, was the president for the Jimmy Carter administration, and an honorary co-chairman for the Millennium Promise.
Foundation to Promote Open Society was a funder for the Millennium Promise, and the Center for American Progress.
George Soros was a supporter for the Center for American Progress, the chairman for the Foundation to Promote Open Society, is the founder & chairman for the Open Society Foundations.
Open Society Foundations was a funder for the Center for American Progress, and the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank).
Gene B. Sperling was a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, and Bob Woodward sent him an email warning him on sequestration coverage, 2013.
Melody C. Barnes was an EVP at the Center for American Progress, and is Barack Obama’s golf partner.
Madeleine K. Albright is a director at the Center for American Progress, and an honorary director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank).
Henry A. Kissinger is a director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), a an honorary chairman for the Center for the National Interest, a member of the Bohemian Club, a director at the American Friends of Bilderberg (think tank), and a 2008 Bilderberg conference participant (think tank).
Richard M. Nixon was the founder of the Center for the National Interest, an honorary member of the Bohemian Club, the president of the Richard M. Nixon administration, Alexander M. Haig Jr. was his chief of staff, and the Watergate scandal led to end of presidency.
Alexander M. Haig Jr. was an honorary director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), and Richard M. Nixon’s chief of staff.
Richard L. Armitage is a director at the Atlantic Council of the United States (think tank), and Bob Woodward’s source.
All the President's Men (1976) was a film about the Watergate scandal.
Robert Redford is an actor in All the President's Men (1976), a trustee at the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the founder & president of the Sundance Institute.
Foundation to Promote Open Society was a funder for the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the Sundance Institute.
George Soros was the chairman for the Foundation to Promote Open Society.
                         




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