Monday, April 24, 2017

LGBT Protests of Chick-Fil-A at Duquesne University Garner National Attention



LGBT Protests of Chick-Fil-A at Duquesne University Garner National Attention
by Thomas D. Williams, Ph.D. 23 Apr 2017
The ongoing saga of LGBT protests of an upcoming Chick-fil-A restaurant on campus at Duquesne University, a Catholic college in Pittsburgh, has taken on biblical dimensions as a test-case of safe spaces and microaggressions in American higher education.

According to its mission statement, Duquesne University is “a Catholic university founded by members of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit,” dedicated to serving God while espousing a “profound concern for moral and spiritual values.” It also professes a commitment to “an ecumenical atmosphere open to diversity.”

For its part, Chick-fil-A CEO management has articulated a biblical understanding of marriage that exactly mirrors Catholic teaching, while also emphasizing that they do not discriminate in any way, and are more than happy to serve anyone who wishes to eat at their establishment.

In 2012, Dan Cathy, CEO of Chick-fil-A, stated: “We are very much supportive of the family — the biblical definition of the family unit. We are a family-owned business, a family-led business, and we are married to our first wives. We give God thanks for that.”

“We know that it might not be popular with everyone, but thank the Lord, we live in a country where we can share our values and operate on biblical principles,” he said.

Lambda Gay-Straight Alliance, the LGBT student organization on campus, considers
Chick-fil-A’s commitment to traditional marriage potentially offensive to gay students, despite the obvious fact that no one is required to patronize the restaurant who doesn’t want to.

At the March 26 meeting, Lambda executive board member Niko Martini proposed that the Student Government Association (SGA) pass a resolution asking the university to reconsider the inclusion of Chick-fil-A as a dining option for students. Martini said he made the proposal on his own behalf and not Lambda’s.

“Chick-fil-A has a questionable history on civil rights and human rights,” Martini said. “I think it’s imperative the university chooses to do business with organizations that coincide with the [university’s] mission and expectations they give students regarding diversity and inclusion.”

Martini did not explain how eliminating a food establishment committed to a biblical understanding of marriage would increase diversity on campus.

Meanwhile Lambda President Rachel Coury expressed worries that the safety of LGBT students might be at risk.

“I’ve tried very hard within the last semester and a half to promote this safe environment for the LGBTQ+ community,” Coury said. “So I fear that with the Chick-fil-A being in Options that maybe people will feel that safe place is at risk.”

Debate sparked by the confrontation, swirling around a series of issues from religious liberty to gay rights to a proper academic environment, have now reached a national level, according to the Duquesne Duke, the university’s campus newspaper.

In an interview on Fox and Friends, retired U.S. Army Ranger Sean Parnell, an alumnus of Duquesne University, minced no words in expressing his dissent from the contemporary environment on the campus of his alma mater.

“They’re a bunch of babies. College is supposed to prepare you for the real world, not shield you from opposing opinions, and safe spaces do exactly that. Who doesn’t want as an undergrad Chick-fil-A on their campus? I would have killed for a c on my campus when I was at Duquesne,” he said.

“My message is: toughen up. There are no safe spaces in the real world,” he said. “If you’re going to be successful in this life after you leave college you’ve got to learn to embrace adversity and open yourself up to a litany of different opinions. You will never be a CEO of a major company or an entrepreneur or a manager if you are not willing to work with people different than you.”

Hostility toward proponents of traditional marriage was foreseen by Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito in his potent dissent of the landmark 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges case that made gay marriage the law of the land.

Alito prophesied that the misguided decision would be used to damage citizens who do not share a contemporary view of marriage as an elastic arrangement between an unspecified number of unspecified persons.

“It will be used,” he wrote presciently, “to vilify Americans who are unwilling to assent to the new orthodoxy.”

Duquesne University
Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney is the lobby firm for Duquesne University.

Note: John A. Barbour is the chairman for the Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney, and a trustee at the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh.
Teresa Heinz Kerry is a trustee emeritus at the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, an emeritus life trustee at the Carnegie Mellon University, an honorary trustee at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and married to John F. Kerry.
Foundation to Promote Open Society was a funder for the Brookings Institution (think tank), the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (think tank), and the Harlem Children's Zone.
George Soros was the chairman for the Foundation to Promote Open Society, a benefactor for the Harlem Children's Zone, is the founder & chairman for the Open Society Foundations, and the founder of the Soros Fund Management. 
Open Society Foundations was a funder for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (think tank), and the Catholic Relief Services.
Jessica Tuchman Mathews was an honorary trustee at the Brookings Institution (think tank), the president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (think tank), is a director at the Nuclear Threat Initiative (think tank), a director at the American Friends of Bilderberg (think tank), and a 2008 Bilderberg conference participant (think tank).
Ed Griffin’s interview with Norman Dodd in 1982
(The investigation into the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace uncovered the plans for population control by involving the United States in war)
Sam Nunn is a co-chairman & CEO for the Nuclear Threat Initiative (think tank), and Michelle Nunn’s father.
Michelle Nunn is Sam Nunn’s daughter, and was a board member for Be the Change.
Kevin Jennings was the president & CEO for the Be the Change, an assistant deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Education, and the founder & executive director for the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network.
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (think tank) was a funder for the Nuclear Threat Initiative (think tank), and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Andrew Carnegie was the founder of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (think tank), the founder of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, an endowed predecessor schools for the Carnegie Mellon University, and the founder of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Carnegie Corporation of New York was a funder for the Nuclear Threat Initiative (think tank), and the Brookings Institution (think tank).
Newton N. Minow is an honorary trustee at the Carnegie Corporation of New York, a member of the Commercial Club of Chicago, and a senior counsel at Sidley Austin LLP.
Commercial Club of Chicago, Members Directory A-Z (Past Research)
Tuesday, December 17, 2013
Francis E. George was a member of the Commercial Club of Chicago, the archbishop for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago, a trustee at the Catholic University of America, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, and a cardinal for the Roman Catholic Church.
R. Eden Martin is the president of the Commercial Club of Chicago, and counsel at Sidley Austin LLP.
Michelle Obama was a lawyer at Sidley Austin LLP.  
Barack Obama was an intern at Sidley Austin LLP.
Cameron F. Kerry is a senior counsel at Sidley Austin LLP, a fellow at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and John F. Kerry’s brother.
John F. Kerry is Cameron F. Kerry’s brother, married to Teresa Heinz Kerry, and was the secretary at the U.S. Department of State for the Barack Obama administration.
Teresa Heinz Kerry is married to John F. Kerry, an emeritus life trustee at the Carnegie Mellon University, an honorary trustee at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and a trustee emeritus at the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh.
John A. Barbour is a trustee at the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, and the chairman for the Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney.
Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney is the lobby firm for Duquesne University.
Stanley F. Druckenmiller is the chairman & benefactor for the Harlem Children's Zone, was a managing director at the Soros Fund Management, and a chairman & CEO for Duquesne Capital Management.
Zachary Schreiber was a managing director at Duquesne Capital Management, is a trustee at the Harlem Children's Zone, and the CEO for PointState Capital.
Former Duquesne managers prep big launch
Point State Capital to start with $5 bln, one of biggest launches ever
By Alistair Barr, MarketWatch
SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — Former managers of Duquesne Capital Management are preparing to start a new hedge fund that will oversee roughly $5 billion, one of the biggest such launches ever, two people familiar with the situation said Friday.
The new fund is called Point State Capital. It will focus on a strategy known as global macro, trading based on broad economic themes.
Point State was over-subscribed. It will close to new investment on the same day as it launches, the people said on condition of anonymity.
Point State may be the second-largest hedge fund launch ever. Jack Meyer, who ran Harvard University’s endowment for almost 15 years, raised a record $6 billion for Convexity Capital Management in 2006. Read about Convexity here.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

McDonnell: Looking for the Real Bastards in South Sudan



McDonnell: Looking for the Real Bastards in South Sudan

by Faith J. H. McDonnell 21 Apr 2017
In late March, speaking with barely controlled anger, Dutch Minister for International Trade and Development Cooperation Lilianne Ploumen told Dutch TV, “The leaders of South Sudan are bastards who starve their own people!”

Ploumen is justified to feel passionate about African babies dying from hunger. Australia’s SBS on March 31 declared the minister “isn’t one for holding back.”

But Ploumen chose to not hold back on the wrong target in South Sudan’s so-called “civil war” that has devastated the nation and its prospects for the past three years. The minister was primarily referring to the democratically-elected President of South Sudan, Salva Kiir Mayardit, omitting criticism of rebel forces causing displacement of populations and exacerbating a famine by preventing adequate access for humanitarian agencies.

U.S. and other politicians, journalists, and humanitarian organizations usually mutter diplomatically that “both sides are at fault” or “all players in the conflict commit atrocities,” while privately condemning President Kiir’s administration and the South Sudan Army. Ploumen, though, didn’t even try to pretend to see any moral equivalence. The Big Man in his cowboy hat from W (fairly certain Kiir has cast off the hat that former Secretary of State Kerry, that old Texas cowhand, gave him to displace deliberately the Bush hat) was in her sights.

These misleading accusations feed on the fact that every narrative about South Sudan is full of confusing acronyms and terms (SPLA, SPLA-IO, GONU, rebels, civil war, etc.) and unattributed actions.

The Government of South Sudan that Kiir leads was renamed the Transitional Government of National Unity, (GONU) in April 2016. A global coalition, including the United States, the African Union, the UN, and others, pressured South Sudan’s leaders into sharing power and leadership with all of their unelected rivals, including the former Vice President Riek Machar. Kiir’s government cooperated with the dictates of internationally imposed leadership as demanded, and has made concession after concession of its own sovereignty for the sake of pursuing peace with rebels like Machar.

Machar has attempted to take over South Sudan by armed rebellion and by a campaign of deception and demonization worthy of Saul Alinsky. He has been aided in this by the Islamic Republic of Sudan (Khartoum), just as he was during Sudan’s civil war in the 1990’s, when he and other current “opposition leaders” tried to take control of what was then southern Sudan. In that rebellion, he was responsible for the death of more southern Sudanese than were the Khartoum jihadists.

A great lesson: stage a violent coup attempt as Machar did in December 2013, be responsible for the death and displacement of hundreds of thousands and for encouraging other leaders to leave the government and join the rebellion, and the international community will reward you by supporting your ‘right’ to be part of the government.

There is calamitous food insecurity in South Sudan. 100,000 citizens are at risk of starvation and half the population, 5.5 million people, face severe food insecurity this summer, according to the World Food Program. Many issues cause this food insecurity, including the displacement of populations by South Sudanese rebels’ attacks and the inability for humanitarian aid to reach affected populations because of the threat from those same rebels, but not deliberate starving of the citizens by the government.

News stories say “fighting,” “civil war,” and raids by “the military” have caused enormous displacement. True enough. But most often, it is the attacks and terror inspired by the rebels – often supported or at least encouraged by the Khartoum regime – or the ensuing firefights between the rebels and the Army that cause people to flee.

In addition, few news stories explain that much food insecurity is actually within the UN “Protection of Civilians” (POC) sites in country. POC’s and refugee camps are overcrowded and food is scarce. GONU officials have urged citizens to return home in peaceful areas where cultivation is taking place. But the UN’s drumbeat of tribal conflict has frightened many South Sudanese and discouraged them from going home.

Finally, there is the claim of humanitarian groups and the UN that the government “denies access” to them in areas where people are starving. But according to a trusted, well-placed source, stacks and stacks of access request forms, photos of which will soon be available publicly, have been approved by the GONU.

The UN is well aware that the requests for access denied are in areas controlled by rebels, not the GONU. The government has neither control nor the ability to protect the humanitarian agencies from attacks and kidnappings by rebel militias aligned with Riek Machar or with others that have taken advantage of the nation’s instability to try to grab power for themselves.

Last November, the UN pushed the GONU until it finally gave access to an area under rebel control. Naturally, the rebel forces of Riek Machar (the SPLA-IO “In Opposition”) ambushed the group. The UN called for help and the real SPLA, the South Sudan Army, came to the rescue. But the SPLA lost 16 of its own men because of this reckless action by humanitarian groups whose loyalty to the rebels is not returned by the rebels. The incident resulted in a notable lack of reports featuring quotes from UN officials expressing their gratitude to the GONU and the SPLA for this sacrificial action.

The criticism of South Sudan appears particularly hollow when compared to international commentary on Sudan. The regime in Khartoum has used government-orchestrated starvation and famine as a weapon of jihad for decades. And it is currently perpetrating three, three genocidal wars: in the Nuba Mountains, in Blue Nile State, and in Darfur, where starvation conditions, not to mention chemical weapons, are always present.

Unlike South Sudan, however, the trade and investment opportunities between the Netherlands and Sudan may be too cozy for insults. Sudan has notably evaded the criticism Ploumen offered – for example, former U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power, lauded a “sea change of improvement in Khartoum’s facilitating of humanitarian access in Sudan” in spite of no change in Khartoum’s policies and declaration of jihad against the black African Christians and Muslims of the Nuba Mountains, Blue Nile State, and Darfur.

Contrary to the assessment of certain Africa policy experts that opine about a country far away with little to no actual experience there, South Sudan was not stillborn. South Sudan was delivered, a baby nation, but then expected to act full grown while emerging from trauma such as most human beings could never imagine. The international community should redirect its anger away from the legitimate South Sudanese government and look to quell the actions of violent rebels supported by the genocidal regime in Khartoum.

Genocidal
Genocide Intervention Network was a merged organization with the Save Darfur Coalition.

Note: Joan R. Platt was a director at the Genocide Intervention Network, a director at the Genocide Intervention Network, and is a director at the Human Rights Watch (think tank).
Open Society Foundations was a funder for the Human Rights Watch (think tank), and the Center for American Progress.   
George Soros is the founder & chairman for the Open Society Foundations, a board member for the International Crisis Group, a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, was the chairman for the Foundation to Promote Open Society, a benefactor for the Human Rights Watch (think tank), and a supporter for the Center for American Progress.   
Foundation to Promote Open Society was a funder for the Human Rights Watch (think tank), the Center for American Progress, and Common Cause.   
Enough Project is an affiliated project for the Center for American Progress.
John Prendergast was a fellow at the Center for American Progress, is a co-founder for the Enough Project, and a co-founder for the Satellite Sentinel Project.
George Clooney is a co-founder for the Satellite Sentinel Project, and was a messenger of peace for the United Nations.
Satellite Sentinel Project monitors the activities in Sudan, and South Sudan.
Harvard Humanitarian Initiative analyzes the images for the Satellite Sentinel Project, and collaborative with Harvard University.
World Food Programme is an affiliate of the United Nations.
United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture is a division of the United Nations.
Lawrence H. Summers is a professor; former president for Harvard University, a board member for the International Crisis Group, a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, was a trustee at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and a distinguished senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.
Samantha Power was a board member for the International Crisis Group, a U.S. ambassador for the United Nations, and is married to Cass R. Sunstein.
Cass R. Sunstein is married to Samantha Power, a professor at the Harvard Law School, and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution (think tank).
Harvard Law School is a school at Harvard University.
Cameron F. Kerry is a fellow at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and Secretary of State John F. Kerry’s brother.
Teresa Heinz Kerry is an honorary trustee at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and married to Secretary of State John F. Kerry.
Alice M. Rivlin is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and a governing board member for Common Cause.
Jack Taylor is a governing board member for Common Cause, and was a chairman for the Alliance to End Hunger.
David Beckmann is the president for the Alliance to End Hunger, the president of the Bread for the World, and a member of the Bretton Woods Committee.
Tony Fratto is a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, and a director at the World Food Program USA.
Daniel R. Glickman is a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, and a director at the World Food Program USA.
George Soros is a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, a board member for the International Crisis Group, the founder & chairman for the Open Society Foundations, was the chairman for the Foundation to Promote Open Society, a benefactor for the Human Rights Watch (think tank), and a supporter for the Center for American Progress.
Lawrence H. Summers is a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, a board member for the International Crisis Group, a professor; former president for Harvard University, was a trustee at the Brookings Institution (think tank), and a distinguished senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.
Enough Project is an affiliated project for the Center for American Progress.
John Prendergast was a fellow at the Center for American Progress, is a co-founder for the Enough Project, and a co-founder for the Satellite Sentinel Project.
George Clooney is a co-founder for the Satellite Sentinel Project, and was a messenger of peace for the United Nations.
Satellite Sentinel Project monitors the activities in Sudan, and South Sudan.
Harvard Humanitarian Initiative analyzes the images for the Satellite Sentinel Project, and collaborative with Harvard University.